krishughes:

University of Wisconsin head basketball coach Bo Ryan is beloved among Badger fans, but a recent move to restrict the transfer opportunities for freshman Jarrod Uthoff has certainly turned some heads, and made people begin to question Ryan’s motives.

According to several reports, Ryan has restricted the schools to which Uthoff can transfer to continue his college basketball career. Uthoff approached Ryan recently and requested to be released from his scholarship to be able to pursue other opportunities which would be a better “offensive fit” for him going forward.

In response, Ryan outlined a list of schools to which Uthoff could not transfer which includes several Big 10 schools and other traditional Wisconsin rivals. While this is within Ryan’s scope according to NCAA basketball rules, the number of schools he outlined on the list is rather excessive, and creates a troubling precedent which future coaches could follow should they choose to make things difficult for departing players.

(Source: listentowooderson)

"Alex Karras, the former Detroit Lions standout who starred in the 1980s sitcom “Webster” - and whose wife says is now suffering from dementia - has joined hundreds of ex-NFL players suing the league over concussion-related injuries.

The suits claim that plaintiffs suffer from neurological problems after sustaining traumatic impacts to the head.

Karras, 76, of California, “sustained repetitive traumatic impacts to his head and/or concussions on multiple occasions” during his NFL career, and “suffers from various neurological conditions and symptoms related to the multiple head traumas,” the latest lawsuit says.” -CNN.com

krishughes:

According to reports, two Western Kentucky football players– defensive lineman Tevin Hollman and defensive back Ricardo Singh– were shot last evening outside the Lava Lounge in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Each young man was hit with a single shot, and their injuries are non life-threatening.

Western Kentucky held its annual Spring Game yesterday afternoon, and many of the players were present at the Lava Lounge just hours after completion of the game. It’s not clear what caused the shooting, but according to witnesses, someone shot into a crowd outside the bar just after midnight which included Hollman and Singh.

(Source: listentowooderson)

krishughes:

The Cotton Bowl Stadium at the Fair Park complex in Dallas, Texas is one of the most legendary venues in college football, if not all of collegiate sports.

Home to the Cotton Bowl game– previously a New Year’s Day tradition, but pushed farther back recently thanks to the BCS– the stadium has been in dire need of an upgrade to keep up with the times, and more importantly, keep the Red River Rivalry game between the Texas Longhorns and Oklahoma Sooners where it belongs.

According to reports, the Cotton Bowl will get a $25.5 million face-lift after a bond election passed through the Dallas City Council on Wednesday. The debt was issued by the city council as debts of obligation to expedite the process and ensure the city would have access to the funding necessary to begin construction improvements in a timely manner.

(Source: listentowooderson)

kristengeilksr: “ESPN’s John Saunders brought up yet another reason the NCAA is to blame for college players leaving after just one year: the players are required to pay insurance on themselves to ensure their safety while playing college basketball, which can cost upwards of $15,000 per year. Players are loaned the money but must repay it upon graduation, meaning that seniors would owe $60,000 after four years of playing- an amount nearly as much as the cost of out-of-state tuition for four year…”

John Calipari has also touched on the financial burden of student insurance and continues to be an outspoken critic of the current college sports model. While his arguments tend to justify his tendency to recruit and rarely graduate elite level players, his insights also shed light on a system that compels elite players to leave college for the pros. Talking about former college standout Brandon Knight, Calipari notes that, 

"Knight was a 4.0 student and had 60 college credits after one year.  He transferred in 23 honors courses, and he graduated with 60 college credits.  That’s two years of work in one year.  But he was the seventh pick of the draft.  How could you tell him to stay? And Detroit, the Pistons, they love him.  They want him to be what their whole organization is about….So it’s not academic, and it isn’t.  It’s what is right for these young people. ”

(Source: ksrcollege.com)

"Isiah Thomas was shocked when he was canned as Florida International’s coach a month after the season ended. It appears that so were his players, and they decided to do some shocking back on Monday. At an end-of-the year banquet held to honor the Golden Panthers on Monday night, the entire basketball team got up and walked out as a highlight reel of the season was introduced.” -Jen Slothower

"

Georgia State’s withdrawal from the CAA and CAA Football is predicated on the university’s desire to reclassify to FBS football which requires membership in an FBS league. We’ve been aware that GSU was having discussions with the Sun Belt Conference as the CAA could not accommodate that desire within GSU’s timeframe. The conference wishes the university well as it pursues these new interests.

The CAA and CAA Football are well positioned to continue to build on our recent accomplishments including two Final Four appearances in men’s basketball, five national championships in football and new national television contracts all of which have been prominent benchmarks during ongoing membership discussions.

"

— CAA Football Commissioner Tom Yeager’s statement regarding Georgia State accepting an invitation to the Sun Belt Conference, April 9, 2012. (via saturdayfootball)

(Source: caafootballblog.com, via saturdayfootball)

theatlantic:

Both the NBA and the NCAA Want to Keep Athletes in College for Too Long

I hate to take a cynical note on this, but I don’t think Mark Emmert, the president of the NCAA, or anyone else in the NCAA really cares about young men going to college—or at least attending college classes. I think what they care about is whether or not these young men play college basketball, and I think what they would like is to have the NBA’s cooperation in doing anything they can to keep boys playing college basketball for as long as they can.
The simple reality is that most basketball and football players who wind up in the pros had little or no interest in going to college in the first place. They want to be first in line for the professional drafts that will take them away from the world of amateur sham, very reasonably wanting their talents to produce revenue for themselves and their families instead of university athletic departments. Now, when the boys are in the best position to make that pay for them, colleges pretending to show some concern.
“It makes a travesty,” said Emmert, “of the whole notion of student as an athlete.” One might call that poetic justice since for nearly a century colleges have been making a travesty of the notion of athlete as student.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Both the NBA and the NCAA Want to Keep Athletes in College for Too Long

I hate to take a cynical note on this, but I don’t think Mark Emmert, the president of the NCAA, or anyone else in the NCAA really cares about young men going to college—or at least attending college classes. I think what they care about is whether or not these young men play college basketball, and I think what they would like is to have the NBA’s cooperation in doing anything they can to keep boys playing college basketball for as long as they can.

The simple reality is that most basketball and football players who wind up in the pros had little or no interest in going to college in the first place. They want to be first in line for the professional drafts that will take them away from the world of amateur sham, very reasonably wanting their talents to produce revenue for themselves and their families instead of university athletic departments. Now, when the boys are in the best position to make that pay for them, colleges pretending to show some concern.

“It makes a travesty,” said Emmert, “of the whole notion of student as an athlete.” One might call that poetic justice since for nearly a century colleges have been making a travesty of the notion of athlete as student.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

thenewandbrave1:

How I feel about college sport…. such a rip off to college athletes….This episode was awesome for taking shots at the NCAA

thenewandbrave1:

How I feel about college sport…. such a rip off to college athletes….This episode was awesome for taking shots at the NCAA

(Source: kingllamathejedi)

divisionelite:

The TCU drug investigation uncovered more players involved in the Scandal. DT D.J. Yendrey , LB Tanner Brock, and OT Ty Horn. Investigators say the players are accused of delivering amounts of marijuana ranging from a quarter ounce to 5 pounds. TCU is a growing program that could reach national championship contention level in a few years. So of course this story is going to get some shine in the media but it brings attention to other issues, PAY THE PLAYERS. If you think that’s too much at least increase their living expenses stipend. These kids are living close to poverty and the fact that they devote so much time to football doesn’t give them the time to get a side job. We could ignore the problem or we could have more student-athletes selling drugs, stealing laptops, or selling school memorabilia. But hey, who cares if the players are struggling as long as the coach is making 3 million a year right?

divisionelite:

The TCU drug investigation uncovered more players involved in the Scandal. DT D.J. Yendrey , LB Tanner Brock, and OT Ty Horn. Investigators say the players are accused of delivering amounts of marijuana ranging from a quarter ounce to 5 pounds. TCU is a growing program that could reach national championship contention level in a few years. So of course this story is going to get some shine in the media but it brings attention to other issues, PAY THE PLAYERS. If you think that’s too much at least increase their living expenses stipend. These kids are living close to poverty and the fact that they devote so much time to football doesn’t give them the time to get a side job. We could ignore the problem or we could have more student-athletes selling drugs, stealing laptops, or selling school memorabilia. But hey, who cares if the players are struggling as long as the coach is making 3 million a year right?